Power Walking for Beginners – How to Walk for Better Health

Updated by Stephen Anton PhD on March 23rd, 2022

Legs of a women power walking in a park with a group in the morning

For years, walking has been a favorite choice in the world of exercise.

Whether you walk in a gym, on a treadmill, or out in nature around your neighborhood, it is a great source of exercise.

However, new research states that leisurely walking doesn’t have the heart-healthy results that power walking leads to (1).

What Is Power Walking?

Power walking means to walk at a vigorous pace.

The increase in your speed and endurance gives the results of a heart-healthy lifestyle.

Power Walking Speed

In terms of speed, it means to walk around 3 to 4.5 miles per hour

Power Walking Time

In terms of time, it means walking a mile in around 13 to 20 minutes

Four Power Walking Benefits

Let’s stroll through some of the reasons that power walking is best!

Power walking is a great exercise, and like other endurance exercises, it can:

Keep you healthy

Improve your fitness

Increase your heart rate and breathing

Help you do the tasks you need every day

Power Walking Technique

Turning your normal walk into a fitness stride requires good posture and purposeful movements.

Ideally, here is how you should walk:

Your head is up, looking forward and not at the ground

Your neck, shoulders, and back are relaxed, not stiffly upright

You’re swinging your arms freely with a slight bend in your elbows

A little pumping with your arms is OK

Your stomach muscles are slightly tightened, and your back is straight, not arched forward or backward

You’re walking smoothly, rolling your foot from heel to toe

How to Start Power Walking

For some, walking for the recommended 30 minutes a day might be difficult.

If so, try walking for 10-minute intervals and build up to three times a day.

As your endurance improves, walk longer until you can advance to a single 30-minute walk.

A great target should be a minimum of 60 minutes a week, but as much as 150 minutes a week.

As your walk becomes easier, add new challenges, such as climbing a hill, extending the time you walk, increasing your walking pace, and an additional day of walking.

Keep Track of How Much You Are Walking

Step counters can help you keep track of your walking, set goals, and measure your progress.

Most inactive people get fewer than 5,000 steps a day, and some very inactive people get only 2,000 steps a day.

Try wearing a step counter for a few days to see how you’re doing.

You will be surprised by your current step levels.

If you get:

Fewer than 5,000 Steps a Day

Gradually add 3,000 to 4,000 more steps a day

About 8,000 Steps a Day

You’re probably meeting the recommended activity target

10,000 or More Steps a Day

You can be confident that you’re getting an adequate amount of endurance activity

10,000 Steps a Day Comfortably

Try for 15,000 steps a day, which would put you in the high activity group

Five Steps to Help Plan Your Power Walking Routine

As you start your walking routine, remember to:

1. Get the Right Power Walking Shoes and Gear

Choose shoes with proper arch support, a firm heel, and thick flexible soles to cushion your feet and absorb shock

Wear comfortable clothes and gear appropriate for various types of weather

If you walk outdoors when it’s dark, wear bright colors or reflective tape for visibility

2. Choose Your Path Carefully

If you’ll be walking outside, avoid paths with cracked sidewalks, potholes, low-hanging limbs, or uneven turf

If the weather isn’t appropriate for walking, consider walking in a shopping mall that offers open times for walkers

3. Warm-up Before Your Walk

Walk at a slow pace for 5-10 minutes to warm up your muscles and prepare your body for exercise

4. Cooldown After Your Walk

At the end of your walk, walk at a slow pace for five to 10 minutes to help your muscles cool down

5. Stretch

After you cool down, gently stretch your muscles

If you prefer to stretch before you walk, remember to warm up first

Set Realistic Power Walking Goals

For most healthy adults, the new research guidelines recommend at least:

150 minutes of aerobic activity per week

75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity per week

Or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity

You can spread activity throughout the week.

The guidelines also recommend strength training exercises of all the major muscle groups at least twice a week.

As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity per day.

If you can’t set aside that much time, try several 10-minute sessions throughout the day.

Remember, it’s OK to start slowly — especially if you haven’t been exercising regularly.

You might start with five minutes a day the first week and then increase your time by five minutes each week until you reach at least 30 minutes.

Five Power Walking Activities to Stay Active

Walking is a simple way to stay active.

You can do it alone, with friends, even with your dog!

Try one of the following activities to get active today:

Nordic walking | Hiking | Walking the dog | Mall walking | Race walking

Four Rules to Stay Motivated

Starting a walking program takes initiative.

Sticking with it takes commitment.

To stay motivated:

1. Set Yourself Up for Success

Start with a simple goal, such as, “I’ll take a 10-minute walk during my lunch break.”

When your 10-minute walk becomes a habit, set a new goal, such as, “I’ll walk for 20 minutes after work”

Soon you could be reaching for goals that once seemed impossible

2. Make Walking Enjoyable

If you don’t enjoy solitary walks, ask a friend or neighbor to join you

If you’re invigorated by groups, join a health club

You might like listening to music while you walk

3. Vary Your Routine

If you walk outdoors, plan several different routes for variety

If you’re walking alone, be sure to tell someone which route you’re taking

Walk in safe, well-lit locations

4. Take Missed Days in Stride

If you find yourself skipping your daily walks, don’t give up

Remind yourself how good you feel when you are moving

Power Walk to Better Health

Keep in mind that according to this research, power walking (vigorous walking) is best to reduce cardiac risks.

You need to be doing this type of exercise at least several times a week for 30 minutes each, but the most valuable is 150 minutes a week.

By doing this exercise, you can expect to be feeling better, giving your body the workout it needs and reducing your risk for heart disease.

So, to walk or not? I say walk, and walk a lot!

More on health:

Intermittent Fasting for Brain Health: A Powerful Tool

Intermittent Fasting Immune System: The Boosting Effects of Fasting

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Anton

I’ve had the privilege of studying the fields of obesity, metabolism, and aging for the past 20 years and felt an increasing desire to share what I’ve learned with as many people as possible the past few years.

More About Dr. Anton
RECENT ARTICLES

Power Walking for Beginners – How to Walk for Better Health

Updated by Stephen Anton PhD on March 23rd, 2022

Legs of a women power walking in a park with a group in the morning

For years, walking has been a favorite choice in the world of exercise.

Whether you walk in a gym, on a treadmill, or out in nature around your neighborhood, it is a great source of exercise.

However, new research states that leisurely walking doesn’t have the heart-healthy results that power walking leads to (1).

What Is Power Walking?

Power walking means to walk at a vigorous pace.

The increase in your speed and endurance gives the results of a heart-healthy lifestyle.

Power Walking Speed

In terms of speed, it means to walk around 3 to 4.5 miles per hour

Power Walking Time

In terms of time, it means walking a mile in around 13 to 20 minutes

Four Power Walking Benefits

Let’s stroll through some of the reasons that power walking is best!

Power walking is a great exercise, and like other endurance exercises, it can:

Keep you healthy

Improve your fitness

Increase your heart rate and breathing

Help you do the tasks you need every day

Power Walking Technique

Turning your normal walk into a fitness stride requires good posture and purposeful movements.

Ideally, here is how you should walk:

Your head is up, looking forward and not at the ground

Your neck, shoulders, and back are relaxed, not stiffly upright

You’re swinging your arms freely with a slight bend in your elbows

A little pumping with your arms is OK

Your stomach muscles are slightly tightened, and your back is straight, not arched forward or backward

You’re walking smoothly, rolling your foot from heel to toe

How to Start Power Walking

For some, walking for the recommended 30 minutes a day might be difficult.

If so, try walking for 10-minute intervals and build up to three times a day.

As your endurance improves, walk longer until you can advance to a single 30-minute walk.

A great target should be a minimum of 60 minutes a week, but as much as 150 minutes a week.

As your walk becomes easier, add new challenges, such as climbing a hill, extending the time you walk, increasing your walking pace, and an additional day of walking.

Keep Track of How Much You Are Walking

Step counters can help you keep track of your walking, set goals, and measure your progress.

Most inactive people get fewer than 5,000 steps a day, and some very inactive people get only 2,000 steps a day.

Try wearing a step counter for a few days to see how you’re doing.

You will be surprised by your current step levels.

If you get:

Fewer than 5,000 Steps a Day
Gradually add 3,000 to 4,000 more steps a day

About 8,000 Steps a Day
You’re probably meeting the recommended activity target

10,000 or More Steps a Day
You can be confident that you’re getting an adequate amount of endurance activity

10,000 Steps a Day Comfortably
Try for 15,000 steps a day, which would put you in the high activity group

Five Steps to Help Plan Your Power Walking Routine

As you start your walking routine, remember to:

1. Get the Right Power Walking Shoes and Gear

Choose shoes with proper arch support, a firm heel, and thick flexible soles to cushion your feet and absorb shock

Wear comfortable clothes and gear appropriate for various types of weather

If you walk outdoors when it’s dark, wear bright colors or reflective tape for visibility

2. Choose Your Path Carefully

If you’ll be walking outside, avoid paths with cracked sidewalks, potholes, low-hanging limbs, or uneven turf

If the weather isn’t appropriate for walking, consider walking in a shopping mall that offers open times for walkers

3. Warm-up Before Your Walk

Walk at a slow pace for 5-10 minutes to warm up your muscles and prepare your body for exercise

4. Cooldown After Your Walk

At the end of your walk, walk at a slow pace for five to 10 minutes to help your muscles cool down

5. Stretch

After you cool down, gently stretch your muscles

If you prefer to stretch before you walk, remember to warm up first

Set Realistic Power Walking Goals

For most healthy adults, the new research guidelines recommend at least:

150 minutes of aerobic activity per week

75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity per week

Or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity

You can spread activity throughout the week.

The guidelines also recommend strength training exercises of all the major muscle groups at least twice a week.

As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity per day.

If you can’t set aside that much time, try several 10-minute sessions throughout the day.

Remember, it’s OK to start slowly — especially if you haven’t been exercising regularly.

You might start with five minutes a day the first week and then increase your time by five minutes each week until you reach at least 30 minutes.

Five Power Walking Activities to Stay Active

Walking is a simple way to stay active.

You can do it alone, with friends, even with your dog!

Try one of the following activities to get active today:

Nordic walking | Hiking | Walking the dog | Mall walking | Race walking

Four Rules to Stay Motivated

Starting a walking program takes initiative.

Sticking with it takes commitment.

To stay motivated:

1. Set Yourself Up for Success

Start with a simple goal, such as, “I’ll take a 10-minute walk during my lunch break.”

When your 10-minute walk becomes a habit, set a new goal, such as, “I’ll walk for 20 minutes after work”

Soon you could be reaching for goals that once seemed impossible

2. Make Walking Enjoyable

If you don’t enjoy solitary walks, ask a friend or neighbor to join you

 If you’re invigorated by groups, join a health club

You might like listening to music while you walk

3. Vary Your Routine

If you walk outdoors, plan several different routes for variety

If you’re walking alone, be sure to tell someone which route you’re taking

Walk in safe, well-lit locations

4. Take Missed Days in Stride

If you find yourself skipping your daily walks, don’t give up

Remind yourself how good you feel when you are moving

Power Walk to Better Health

Keep in mind that according to this research, power walking (vigorous walking) is best to reduce cardiac risks.

You need to be doing this type of exercise at least several times a week for 30 minutes each, but the most valuable is 150 minutes a week.

By doing this exercise, you can expect to be feeling better, giving your body the workout it needs and reducing your risk for heart disease.

So, to walk or not? I say walk, and walk a lot!

More on health:

Intermittent Fasting for Brain Health: A Powerful Tool

Intermittent Fasting Immune System: The Boosting Effects of Fasting

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Anton

I’ve had the privilege of studying the fields of obesity, metabolism, and aging for the past 20 years and felt an increasing desire to share what I’ve learned with as many people as possible the past few years.

More About Dr. Anton
RECENT ARTICLES
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Anton

I’ve had the privilege of studying the fields of obesity, metabolism, and aging for the past 20 years and felt an increasing desire to share what I’ve learned with as many people as possible the past few years.

More About Dr. Anton
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